FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


Universal Tennis Rating (UTR) Announces Partnership with Lawn Tennis Association, Expands Global Footprint


LTA joins Tennis Canada, the Intercollegiate Tennis Association and 6 USTA Sections working with UTR



September 6, 2016 – Universal Tennis Rating (UTR), the first worldwide rating for tennis players, today announced a collaborative working relationship with the Lawn Tennis Association (LTA), the national governing body for tennis in Great Britain. The LTA becomes the latest governing body to work with UTR, expanding its global footprint.

The LTA now sends all weekly results from its sanctioned tournaments in the 12U (age 12 and under) category, as well as 14U, 16U, 18U, and Open categories, to UTR. This trove of data from the U.K., home of the Wimbledon championships, includes all Grade 1-5 events -- the top five (of seven) levels of competition sanctioned by the LTA, with Grade 1 representing top-echelon national tournaments.

The Lawn Tennis Association alliance with UTR makes Great Britain the first Grand Slam nation to fully connect with UTR’s rapidly growing global rating system. “The relationship we are building with the LTA, through which they feed in a wide range of results, will provide tremendous value at no cost to the player or the federation—and give each of these British players a worldwide rating,” says Bruce Waschuk, CEO of UTR.

Keith Carder, LTA Head of Competition stated “We are delighted to provide our results to UTR to enable British Players to gain a Universal Tennis Rating. The UTR will work alongside our existing British Tennis Rating & Ranking system and be beneficial for our players, especially those currently or considering playing college tennis in America”.

Momentum for UTR’s simple, worldwide metric has been building steadily. Tennis Canada came on board in February. The Intercollegiate Tennis Association (ITA) which oversees college tennis competition, uses UTR ratings to assist with selections and seedings for select regional and national events. “While UTR's international ratings have obvious recruiting value for both coaches and players, the widespread use and understanding of Universal Tennis Rating's approach to tournament play could have a transformative effect on the entire spectrum of player development in America,” says Dave Fish, Harvard Men’s Tennis Coach.UTR has also been catching fire among junior players and coaches in another Grand Slam nation: the United States of America. Six of the USTA’s sections now actively employ UTR in managing some of their competitive events including Northern California, Southern California, Southwest, Texas, Midwest, and the Eastern section.

UTR has also announced that it will soon add doubles ratings, beginning with college tennis, and launched the Team Compare feature that allows its subscribers to juxtapose team lineups to see how they stack up against each other.




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About Universal Tennis

We at Universal Tennis believe that good competition is the key to developing tennis players. The Universal Tennis Rating® (UTR) system delivers that critical component by facilitating level-based match play.

Over the last 10 years, UTR has recorded more than 3.5 million tennis results from professional, collegiate, and national-, sectional-, and district-level junior tournaments, as well as high school play in 204 countries. Our research has shown that grouping players according to ability rather than age produces the highest percentage of competitive matches. Events with a wider range (more levels) of skill generate fewer competitive contests. UTR is the simplest, most effective method available for matching players by level of skill.



About the LTA

  • The Lawn Tennis Association (LTA) is the National Governing Body for tennis in Great Britain, responsible for developing and promoting the sport with a mission to get more people playing tennis more often. It does this under the consumer brand of British Tennis, by working with a broad range of partners and over 25,000 volunteers, to grow the game in communities, clubs and schools.
  • The LTA represents the interests of more than five million men and women, girls and boys across the country that play tennis on more than 23,000 courts.
  • The LTA runs and supports a network of 11,500 approved tournaments for players of all ages, the corner-stones of which are five grass court pro events leading up to Wimbledon, held in Nottingham (ATP & WTA), Birmingham (WTA), Queen’s Club-London (ATP) and Eastbourne (WTA), all of which are title sponsored by Aegon, our lead Partner who is helping transform the sport in this country.
  • The LTA works in partnership with its charitable entity, the Tennis Foundation, to provide a tennis provision for almost 20,000 schools, disadvantaged youth as well as promoting tennis as an inclusive sport for anyone with a disability.
  • The LTA created a Davis Cup legacy campaign following Great Britain’s historic first win in 79 years, committing to deliver 10,000 free racquets and courses as well as a Trophy Tour, nationwide.
  • For further information about the LTA and British Tennis, and to review the British Tennis strategy for 2015 – 2018 visit www.lta.org.uk or follow us on Twitter @BritishTennis.

For more information, contact:
Sue Hunt, sue@universaltennis.com (203)682-5331


Free UTR subscriptions at universaltennis.com


FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


Former USTA Marketing Exec Sue Hunt Named Chief Marketing Officer at Universal Tennis



September 6, 2016 – Universal Tennis announced today former USTA marketing exec Sue Hunt has been named its Chief Marketing Officer. Hunt will oversee the digital and marketing efforts for Universal Tennis and its Universal Tennis Rating (UTR), a new system for rating players worldwide.

“Sue is uniquely qualified to lead our marketing efforts,” said Universal CEO Bruce Waschuk. “She understands the power and global impact UTR can have throughout tennis from junior competition, recreational play of all ages and the college and professional levels.”

UTR, the tennis equivalent to a golf handicap, feature 16 levels that can track a player’s progression from introductory junior competition (red ball tournaments) to the top level of professional tennis. UTR is currently being utilized by a growing number of governing bodies around the world including the Lawn Tennis Association in Great Britain, Tennis Canada, 6 USTA Sections and the Intercollegiate Tennis Association.

Momentum for UTR’s simple, worldwide metric has been building steadily. Tennis Canada came on board in February. The Intercollegiate Tennis Association (ITA) which oversees college tennis competition, uses UTR ratings to assist with selections and seedings for select regional and national events. “While UTR's international ratings have obvious recruiting value for both coaches and players, the widespread use and understanding of Universal Tennis Rating's approach to tournament play could have a transformative effect on the entire spectrum of player development in America,” says Dave Fish, Harvard Men’s Tennis Coach.UTR has also been catching fire among junior players and coaches in another Grand Slam nation: the United States of America. Six of the USTA’s sections now actively employ UTR in managing some of their competitive events including Northern California, Southern California, Southwest, Texas, Midwest, and the Eastern section.

“I am thrilled to be part of such an innovative and progressive company. UTR has listened to the many voices in tennis looking for a new system that was made for all players to ensure great competition,” said Hunt. “Having over 2,700 ratings worldwide is not the approach a modern company would endorse and moving to a universal rating will allow all to enjoy level based play.”

Hunt worked at the USTA for 9 years, most recently as its Chief Marketing Officer from 2011-15. She worked across all channels to grow and market the association’s endeavors both in the professional and community realms, including the development and execution of the “It Must Be Love” advertising campaign for the US Open and the Emirates Airline US Open Series. She also has orchestrated and oversaw the development of a marketing and advertising campaign for the USTA’s youth tennis initiative with a series of television and digital marketing elements advocating changes in the game to get more kids involved in tennis at a younger age.

Prior to joining the USTA, Hunt held marketing and sales positions at various posts, working for Proctor & Gamble, Unilever, Kraft and L’Oreal USA.

Hunt graduated from the University of Connecticut with a degree in economics. Her husband, Scott Slobin, is a teaching pro in Fairfield, Conn., where the couple lives with their three children.




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About Universal Tennis

We at Universal Tennis believe that good competition is the key to developing tennis players. The Universal Tennis Rating® (UTR) system delivers that critical component by facilitating level-based match play.

Over the last 10 years, UTR has recorded more than 3.5 million tennis results from professional, collegiate, and national-, sectional-, and district-level junior tournaments, as well as high school play in 204 countries. Our research has shown that grouping players according to ability rather than age produces the highest percentage of competitive matches. Events with a wider range (more levels) of skill generate fewer competitive contests. UTR is the simplest, most effective method available for matching players by level of skill.

For more information, contact:
Bojana Ducanovic, bojana@universaltennis.com (361) 461-0008


Free UTR subscriptions at universaltennis.com


tennis-ball

We believe that competition is the key to tennis player development, and the Universal Tennis Rating® (UTR) System provides that critical component by facilitating “level-based” match play.

Over the last ten years Universal Tennis has monitored hundreds of thousands of tennis results from professional, collegiate, and national, sectional and district level junior tournaments, as well as high school play. Our research has shown that events with the narrowest range of levels of players (fewer levels) produced the highest number of competitive matches, whereas the events with the largest range (greater number of levels) produced the lowest number of competitive matches.

The UTR system was devised in order to encourage and facilitate competitive matches between similarly rated players. This led to the development of a truly “universal” rating system and methodology—now called the Universal Tennis Rating® System-- that is based on principles not found in other tennis rating systems.