What is a Universal Tennis Rating (UTR)?

A Universal Tennis Rating® (UTR) is a number, between 1.00 and 16.50, that indicates a player’s level of play.

How often are the ratings updated?

Ratings are recalculated every day and the new ratings are published to the site the following morning.

How are UTRs calculated?

UTRs are result-based and are generally calculated using a player’s last 30 matches within the last 12 months. The main factors are percentage of games won and opponent’s rating.

The number and scope of tournament match results that are being imported to the UTR database is literally growing every week, and currently include:

  • USTA sanctioned national, sectional, regional, district level tournaments, for juniors in the age groups 12 and up
  • College results posted on the ITA site
  • USTA sanctioned Open level tournaments
  • USTA sanctioned NTRP tournaments for levels 4.0 and up
  • WTA and ATP professional tennis tournaments
  • ITF Pro Circuit and Junior (U18) events
  • Tennis Europe tournaments
  • Tennis Canada tournaments for juniors (12U and up) and adults
  • British LTA tournaments (Grade 1 through 5) for age groups U12 and up and Adult Open
  • CBT sanctioned tournaments from Brazil
  • Tennis Australia JT and AMT events
  • UTR events hosted on our Events platform
You can report an incorrect score by sending us a message through our Contact Us form or sending us an email to contact@universaltennis.com.
UTR is used by players, coaches, fans, clubs, academies, and various federations.
The reliability percentage is a measure of the accuracy of the player’s rating, based on the number and quality of matches they have played against other rated players. A reliability of 100% indicates that the player has played enough matches against other rated players in the last 12 months to have an accurate rating. On the other hand, a reliability of 0% means that the player is inactive and has not played any matches in the last 12 months.
The best way to improve your UTR is to compete on a regular basis especially against players who are close to your level and try to win as many games as possible in every single match.

You can use your UTR to:

  1. Determine your level of play
  2. Track your progress over-time by following your historical ratings graph
  3. Find tournaments in your area that match your level of play
  4. Find a college team that would be the best fit
The competitiveness percentage refers to the percentage of a player's last 30 matches (regardless of who won) that were competitive. A best of three set match is considered to be competitive when the losing player wins more than 50% of the games needed to win the match. So 6-3, 6-4 is a competitive match.

Our rating system takes the last 30 matches within the last 12 months into account to calculate the ratings. That makes it hard to predict exactly how a player’s rating will move after a few matches because as new results come in, older results fall off the equation. So if a player has three great results added to the equation, but three older results that were equally good or better fall out of the equation at the same time then the player’s rating will stay the same or maybe even drop slightly.

Moreover, a player's rating can also change based on changes in the ratings of their recent opponents.

In your case it may have been a combination of both these factors that led to the drop.

We are developing an online tool that will allow coaches to manage rosters and input scores from high school matches, which we plan to launch in the near future. The scores from the past season can then be entered into our system. Please stay tuned to our blog and social media channels for further updates.
No. Only singles matches count towards your UTR. Doubles matches are only being recorded so they can be used for the calculation of a player’s doubles UTR which we are planning on launching soon. So every player will eventually have a singles UTR that is based on singles scores and a doubles UTR based on doubles results.
The ratings on our site are very dynamic since they are recalculated every day. So even if you haven’t played any matches recently, it can change based on changes in the ratings of your recent opponents. Moreover, since our system only takes a player’s last 30 matches played within the last 12 months, your rating can change as some of those scores start getting excluded since they no longer fall within that time frame.
You can report an incorrect score by sending us a message through our Contact Us form or sending us an email to contact@universaltennis.com.
We import all our college scores from the ITA website. Please ask your coach to post the scores there early each week so we can get them into our system when we import the college scores again the next Wednesday.

You can update your team profile info (i.e. add coach names and contact details, website, social media addresses, etc.)

In order to update your team page, follow these steps:

  1. If you have not already had been setup with administrative rights to your team, please use our Contact Us form or send us an email at contact@universaltennis.com and we'll verify and grant access to your account.
  2. Search / go to your team profile page at https://universaltennis.com
  3. Click on the "more menu" (i.e. three dots).
  4. Select "Admin".
  5. Add your details you wish to display and save changes.
  6. Show off your custom profile with other coaches that haven't customized their profile yet.

See this video for a visual walkthrough.

The Power 6 is the combined rating of the top 6 players of a college team. It can be used as a measure of a team’s strength.

See this video for a visual walkthrough.

You can find UTR Events by clicking on the Events link on the main menu of the UTR website. Simply click on the event you are interested in and follow the directions to sign up.
Please check out our event page for more information.
Since our payment processing is entirely handled by Paypal, you will need to get in touch with them to update that information.Alternatively, you can just let your current subscription expire and then sign up with the new credit card by logging into your account and then clicking on the Account link at the top right of the page.

A Universal Tennis Rating® (UTR) is a number, calculated to two decimal places, that indicates an individual’s current level of play.

UTRs range from 1.00 (beginners) to 16.50 (top professionals) and are calculated based on each player’s last 30 match results for matches played within the last 12 months.

A Rated Player is any individual for whom there are match results stored in the UTR database, and for whom Universal Tennis has calculated that player’s UTR. It is not necessary to be a registered member of Universal Tennis to be a Rated Player. There are currently well over 100,000 Rated Players in the UTR database.

A player’s rating Reliability is a measure of the accuracy of the player’s UTR, based on the number and quality of match results he/she has played against other Rated Players.

A player’s rating Reliability of 100% means that the player has played enough matches against opponents with high rating reliabilities during the last 12 months to calculate a very accurate UTR for the player. A player’s rating Reliability of less than 100% next to a player’s rating indicates that the player has not played enough matches in the last 12 months, against opponents with high reliability, to ensure an accurate UTR for the player. A player’s rating Reliability of 0% means the player is inactive, and has not played any (UT-recorded) matches in the last 12 months against rated opponents.

There is also a match result Reliability factor, which figures into the calculation of a player’s overall UTR. In brief, a match result Reliability factor for each match is a measure of the reliability of that particular match as an indicator of the player’s overall playing level; and, accordingly, matches having higher match result Reliability factors are given more weight (than matches having lower match result Reliability factors) when calculating a player’s overall UTR.

A player is described as having reached the Competitive Threshold in a match if that player wins at least 1 game more than half the minimum number of games needed to win the match. For example, the minimum number of games that must be won to be the victor in a best 2-sets-out-of-3 format match is 12 games (i.e., the victor has to win at least six games in each of two sets). So, half of that (12) minimum is six games; and one more than that is 7 games. Thus, in a 2-sets-out-of-3 format match, the Competitive Threshold is 7 games... meaning that a player must win at least seven games in a 2-sets-out-of-3 format match to reach the Competitive Threshold in that match.

The table below illustrates how this applies to matches of various formats:

Match Format Minimum number of games needed to be won to reach the Competitive Threshold Examples of matches where the Competitive Threshold was reached by the losing player
One set match 4 6-4
Best of three set match 7 6-3, 6-4
Best of five set match 10 6-3, 6-3, 6-4
Eight-game pro set 5 8-5
Ten-game pro set 6 10-6

A match is said is to be in the Competitive Zone when the difference between the UTRs of the two players in the match is 1.0 or less.

For example, a match between Player A (with a UTR of 10.65) against Player B (with a UTR of 11.45) is considered to be inside the Competitive Zone… because the difference between the UTRs of the two players is 0.80, which is within 1.0.

On the other hand, if the UTRs of the players were 10.65 and 11.75, respectively, then the match would be considered outside the Competitive Zone since the difference is 1.10.

Our research has shown that the majority of Competitive match results are produced by matches that are matches inside the Competitive Zone; whereas the majority of Decisive match results are produced by matches that are matches outside the Competitive Zone.

In Universal Tennis an Upset is said to occur when a player whose UTR is more than 1.0 higher than the player’s opponent ends up losing the match.

For example, if a player with a UTR of 11.75 loses to a player with a UTR of 10.65, then it is considered to be an Upset, because the winner was rated 1.10 below the loser. On the other hand, if a player with a UTR of 11.75 loses to a player with a UTR of 11.65, it would not be considered an Upset, because the two players were so closely rated (within 0.10 points of each other) before the match.

Based on the concept of the Competitive Threshold (see above), a match is considered to have been Competitive when the losing player wins more than 50% of the minimum number of games needed to win the match. For example, if Player A beats Player B 6-4, 6-4 then the match is Competitive... because a minimum of 12 games is needed to win the match, and Player B won 8 games (which is more than 50% of 12). Thus, it would be said that Player A had a Competitive win against Player be in this match. Generally, in a best 2-sets-out-of-3 format, matches are considered Competitive whenever the losing player wins a total of at least 7 games.

Similarly, a match is considered to have be Routine if the losing player is only able to win between 34% and 50% of the minimum number of games needed to win the match. For example, if Player A beats Player B 6-2, 6-3 then the match is considered Routine... because Player B only won 5 games (which is only 42% of 12). Thus, it would be said that Player A had a Routine win against Player B in this match. Generally, in a best 2-sets-out-of-3 format, matches are considered Routine whenever the losing player wins a total of between 4 and 6 games.

Lastly, a match is considered to be Decisive if the losing player is only able to win less than a third of the minimum number of games needed to win the match. For example, if Player A beats Player B 6-1, 6-0 then the match is considered Decisive because Player B only won 1 game (which is only 8% of 12). Thus, it would be said that Player A had a Decisive win over Player B in this match. Generally, in a best 2-sets-out-of-3 format, matches are considered Decisive whenever the losing player wins a total of 3 or fewer games. The percentage of Competitive, Routine, and Decisive matches played by a player give an insight into a player’s overall level of competition.

A Power 6 Rating is the combined ratings of the 6 highest-rated players on a college team. For example, the Power 6 Rating for the team listed below is 71.49.

Name Rating
Player 1 12.32
Player 2 12.24
Player 3 12.20
Player 4 11.80
Player 5 11.53
Player 6 11.40
Power 6 Rating 71.49

A Power 6 UTR Spread is the spread between the UTR of the highest-rated player and the UTR of the 6th highest-rated player on a college team. For example, the Power 6 UTR Spread for the team listed below is 11.40 to 12.32.

Name Rating
Player 1 12.32
Player 2 12.24
Player 3 12.20
Player 4 11.80
Player 5 11.53
Player 6 11.40

The Power 6 UTR Spread can be used by potential college players as one tool to help them easily identify on which college teams there are players whose ratings are similar to their own (current or projected) rating.

The 16 Levels of the Universal Tennis Rating Scale

16
15
14
13
 

STAGE 4

12
11
10
9
 

STAGE 3

8
7
6
5
 

STAGE 2

4
3
2
1
 

STAGE 1

 

NOVICE

Slide your mouse over the pyramid to see descriptions of each level

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